Job Interview Tips

Job Interview Tips

Job interviews are what most people never get used to. If you have a job interview soon and you are stressed, the first thing you should do is not to think about the aftermath. Focus on the interview and your resume and on what you need to know to take the job.

Basically, an interview is where you try to get the job. Moreover, given the limited amount of time an interview lasts, all you can do is appear. It`s impossible for the interviewers to learn who you really are in 60 minutes. On the other hand you can appear like the one they are looking to hire.

The first thing that enters into play is your appearance as far as it shapes the interviewer’s first impression of you.

Studies show that an unfavorable first impression is enough for a negative outcome. Wear clothes that fit you and the job you are applying for. Shoes play an important role in the way you look as well, it pays to invest in a good pair of shoes.

With a positive first impression in his mind, the next question your employer will try to answer himself is whether you are technically fit for the job or not. At the same time he will attempt to learn as much as possible about your personality through your gestures. At this point you are called to appear qualified and act in such a way as to betray a strong personality. Your personality counts, sometimes it counts even more than what you appear to know.

Self-confidence is an important aspect of your character.

To appear self confident shake hands firmly at the beginning and keep eye contact with the employer from the beginning till the end of the interview. Pay attention to your posture as far as bad posture makes you appear as lacking self-confidence.

The vocabulary you use to answer the questions counts as well.

When phrasing your answers try to keep it simple, use elaborate language only when it confers particularly well what you mean. Excessive use of academic terms makes your answers not easy to understand. Incomprehensible is the last thing you want to be in a job interview. Additionally, you must avoid at all costs behaviors that betray at any rate a lack of interest for the job. Such behaviors are arriving late at the interview or short answers like ok or so so which betray carelessness.

As for proving that you got the right technical knowledge to get the job it is strongly recommended that you read something about the company beforehand. With a clear company profile in your mind you can pick up those achievements and experiences of yours that do fit particularly well the profile. It will make you sound perfect. It is also important to let the interviewer know that you are willing to learn.
At the end of the interview you might ask few questions about details.

Before leaving don’t forget to say thank you and shake hands firmly with the interviewer.

Resume advice from recruiters

With so many applicants competing for jobs these days, you must make sure that your resume stands out to increase your chances of landing an interview. Here are some resume format tips for successful resume writing:

Easy on the eyes – A resume that stands out requires little effort when read. It should immediately convince an employer why you are qualified for the job. A professional summary at the top is the best way to sell your skills to hiring managers. A summary can also tailor your resume so that your skills fit the job description like a glove.

Show immediate benefits – When writing your professional summary, you must also concentrate on the immediate benefits you can contribute to the organization rather than stating your objectives if the company hires you. Hiring managers won’t care what an applicant wants to do. What they do care about is if the applicant will be able to perform the tasks expected of them.

Quantify your accomplishments – The best way to sell your skills is by quantifying your accomplishments. Don’t be shy about the results of the projects you were involved in. Remember that facts always speak louder than words.

Job Relocation Questions to Ask

Relocating to a new place is becoming a common trend since not all states are affected by the recession in the same way. Job seekers would naturally want to relocate to a state that has more opportunities for employment.

However, relocating to a new place also has its risks. Avoid the problems of job-related relocation by asking yourself these important questions:

What’s my motive?

The recession has made life difficult, not just on the professional level but on the personal one as well. If you’re thinking about relocating, it’s important for you be aware of your real motives. Your job relocation might just be a convenient excuse to escape personal problems. If you are running away from personal problems, you’re probably wasting time, effort and money. Remember that problems don’t vanish unless you solve them.

Accept a job relocation only if it truly gives you the best chance of improving your current situation.

Will I have a future?

If the job is just about paying the bills, then relocating may be too big a risk. Relocating means leaving people you know, spending money to be able to transfer and, in some cases, selling what you already have. If you pursue a job that has no opportunity for career growth, then your job transfer move might not be worth it.

Do I have all the bases covered?

Relocating will cost you money. The new job you’re eyeing might provide a higher salary than you have today. But until that first paycheck comes, do you already have enough resources to cover the cost of living in the new place?

If you’re seriously considering job relocation, get that head start by saving as much money as you can now. Doing so will help ease your transition in the new place.

In addition, if you have friends or family in the place you’re moving to, you may want to consider moving in with them for the first month or so to help you settle in the new state. Use the extra time to research on better deals for rent or maybe even a mortgage.

What We Can Learn From Santa About Looking for Work

What We Can Learn From Santa About Looking for Work

In 1986 Robert Fulghum published the number one best seller, “All I Really Need To Know I Learned In Kindergarten.” I recall how the book “spoke to me” at a time when my life had recently been turned up-side-down and I was having to deal with things that were totally unfamiliar to me. I found that if I could relate the unknown to something for which I had experience (something that turned out positive) it was easier to cope, and learn, and accomplish my goals.

Looking for employment and finding my way in a world full of professionals who seemed to have some secret guidebook on how to successfully manage their careers, was one of those unfamiliar things that was thrust upon me. As with Fulghum’s book, I found familiar life experiences – for example, child rearing, planning a trip, or dating to be somewhat analogous to my tasks at hand. And as I found employment and began molding my career, I discovered that I could help others do the same by connecting them to analogies in their own life that would help dispel some of the mystery – and anxiety – about job search and career management.

In that regard, I am creating this book review to tell you about two delightful children’s books I discovered a few years ago, which were written by Stephen Krensky: “How Santa Got His Job” and “How Santa Lost His Job.”  This has been an extremely trying year for professionals. Many have lost their jobs and many have spent an unprecedented amount of time (28.5 weeks, on average) trying to find new employment. When faced with the unfamiliar (and somewhat scary) reality of the job market, why not turn to something/someone more familiar for guidance. And who is better known than Santa Claus?

I gleaned from Krensky’s books 10 valuable, yet simple, lessons about finding employment and a satisfying career taught by a jolly old fat man in a red suit:

  1. Identify your interests, abilities and values
  2. Sample different jobs
  3. Recognize when something is not a good fit
  4. Accept that some people will not like you or the way you work
  5. Keep your eyes open for new opportunities
  6. Don’t internalize failure – learn from it
  7. Build and nurture a strong professional network
  8. Don’t go it alone – work and problem solve as a team
  9. Leverage your strengths and work on improving your weaknesses
  10. Remember that no job is perfect – always be prepared with the right tools and resources